Salmon and Leeks Baked in Parchment

 

This is a recipe I got from Promenades Gourmandes, an amazing French culinary tour and cooking class I got to do with my family in Paris this year. I make absolutely no claim to this recipe as my own, but it’s too good not to share and I couldn’t find it on the PG website. The only thing I changed was using baking parchment instead of aluminum foil.

  • 4 salmon filets
  • 4 leeks, white part only
  • a bunch of fresh herbs (parsley, tarragon, chives, and/or mint)
  • 2 tbsps olive oil
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 lemon “citron confit” rind only, minced (see below)
  • Parchment
  1. Peel and wash the leeks, keeping the white part only. Slice thinly.
  2. Heat olive oil in a saucepan, add leaks, season with salt, cover, and let simmer slowly for 10 minutes to make leek fondue. Add pepper at the end.
  3. Tear off 4 large sheets of parchment, line with olive oil, and place one salmon filet on each sheet. Spread 1 Tbsp leek fondue over the top, add the cured lemon and herbs, and crimp closed tightly, leaving some space between the preparation and the top of the parchment. This will allow steam to develop inside the papillote and moisten the fish.
  4. Bake in preheated hot oven 450 degrees for 8 to 15 minutes, depending on filet size and personal taste.

Citrons Confits (Cured Lemons, Moroccan Style)

If you can plan ahead, the real cured lemons are best. The taste is really worth the extra effort. You can also buy them here. If you are making this on the fly, follow this recipe for quick preserved lemons.

  • 6-8 thick-skinned lemons
  • 1 quart mason jar
  • rock sea salt
  • water
  1. Cut lemons into quarters but keep attached at one end. Stuff with rock sea salt and pack tightly in a jar, squeezing the lemons together.
  2. Close jar and turn over several times during the next 24 hours. Then, depending on the quantity of juice released, add water if necessary to make sure there is no air in the jar.
  3. Keep on a shelf for 3 months at room temperature away from light.
  4. When ready, use only rind; lemon pulp should be discarded.